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Mugwort Herb

Also known as Artemisia vulgaris, Felon herb, Common Wormwood, Common Mugwort, Douglas Mugwort, St. John's Plant, Sailor's Tobacco, Cronewort. 

Introduction  Mugwort is a common plant in the British isles, its angular, purple stalks growing 3 feet (90 cm) or more in height and bearing dark green leaves with a cottony down underneath. Mugwort is said to have derived its name from having been used to flavor beer before the wide use of hops. The botanical name is derived from Artemisia, the Greek goddess of the hunt, fertility, and the forests and hills. Roman soldiers were known to put mugwort in their sandals to keep their feet from getting tired. Native Americans equate mugwort with witchcraft. They believed that the rubbing of the leaves on the body are said to keep ghosts away, and a necklace of mugwort leaves is said to help protect against dreaming about the dead. It has been believed that John the Baptist wore a girdle of mugwort in the wilderness for protection. Other magical attributes include the protection for road weary travelers, and general protection against the evils of the spirit realms. 

Constituents  Essential oil containing 1,8-cineole, camphor, linalool, or thujone, along with over 100 other identified components. The flowers also contain beta-sitosterol, coumarins, and alpha- and beta-carotene. 

Parts Used Dried flowers. 

Typical Preparations  Traditionally used as a tea, may also be encapsulated or taken as an extract. Popularly mixed with other botanicals to create dream and sleep pillows for the invocation of dreams. 

Summary Bitter mugwort teas stimulate the secretion of gastric juices to speed up digestion and relieve flatulence and bloating. The essential oil is both antibacterial and antifungal, and may be useful against intestinal parasites. Many have reported that if mugwort is used as a tea before bed, or even just sprinkled around your pillow, a person may have lucid dreams that night. 

Precautions  Internal use not recommended while pregnant. Habitual use may cause nervous problems and liver damage.

PURCHASE MUGWORT HERB EXTRACT

For educational purposes only. This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.

This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  This information courtesy ofMOUNTAIN ROSE HERBS, with full, written permission for reuse.  For further traditional information concerningMugwort Herb, please visit this excellent resource from Botanical.com.  Used with full, written permission.